2016 Participant Bios

Mark Barajas, PhD

Barajas, MarkMark Barajas earned his Ph.D. in counseling psychology in 2015 from Western Michigan University after completing his doctoral internship at University of California Berkeley’s Counseling and Psychological Services (CPS). In his current position as a Postdoctoral Fellow at UC Berkeley’s CPS, he is accruing the necessary hours for full licensure as a psychologist.  Originally from Sacramento, California, Dr. Barajas earned a B.S. in psychology from University of California Davis and an M. A. in counseling psychology from Western Michigan University.  His research focuses on the training of culturally competent teachers by investigating ways in which implicit bias affects teacher-student relationships and the teaching-learning process.  Collaborating with teacher educators and local school districts, he designs, implements, and measures the effectiveness of curricular interventions intended to mitigate the negative effects of implicit bias.  His clinical interests include multicultural counseling, serving first-generation college students, Latino/a mental health, grief and loss, and emotion-focused therapy.  He is Spanish-English bilingual, a former high school science teacher, and served as an environmental education volunteer in Bolivia with the Peace Corps. In his spare time he enjoys spending time with his family and pets, being outdoors, cooking, reading, making music, and playing video games.

Colton Brown

Brown, ColtonColton Brown is a second-year student in Oklahoma State University’s counseling psychology doctoral program. He received his M.S. in educational psychology from Oklahoma State University and his B.A.s in psychology and sociology from Georgia State University. Colton’s research specializations include non-monosexuality, use of creativity and media in counseling, and sport psychology. His advocacy work includes projects on foster and adoptive youth, bi/pan/queer/fluid community outreach, and relational violence prevention with high school athletes. In his clinical work, Colton emphasizes connecting college students to campus resources and establishing community in order to foster growth. Colton also serves as the OSU Campus Representative for the Division 17 Section for Positive Psychology. Upon completion of his degree, Colton hopes to serve as a faculty member with specific emphasis on mentoring and teaching.

Collette Chapman-Hilliard, PhD

Chapman Hilliard, ColletteDr. Collette Chapman-Hilliard is an Assistant Professor of psychology and clinical mental health counseling at the College of Staten Island, City University of New York. She earned her M.A. in educational psychology and Ph.D. in counseling psychology from the University of Texas at Austin. She completed her doctoral internship at the University of Pennsylvania’s Counseling and Psychological Services. Dr. Hilliard’s scholarly interests include racial and ethnic minority identity development, cultural knowledge and critical consciousness, and culture-centered psychological measurement and assessment.  She examines the aforementioned areas as they relate to psychological, social, and academic achievement outcomes among racial and ethnic minority populations with a particular focus on people of African descent.  Complementing her research interests, Dr. Hilliard’s clinical interests include multiculturalism and social justice in therapy, trauma experiences, and women’s issues.  She is an active member of the American Psychological Association and the Association of Black Psychologists.

Mun Yuk Chin

Chin, Mun YukMun Yuk Chin is a second-year Ph.D. student in counseling psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She was born in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and grew up in both Malaysia and Singapore. Mun Yuk obtained her B.A. in economics and psychology at the University of Virginia. During her time there, she discovered her passion for exploring the connections between gender, sexual orientation, culture, and health. Mun Yuk also worked in IT consulting prior to pursuing her M.A. in counseling psychology at Northwestern University. Her research interests include coping mechanisms and contributors to resiliency among sexual and gender minorities, and influences of social class on mental health. Mun Yuk is currently training as a practicum therapist at Marquette University’s Counseling Center.

Evelyn Hunter, PhD

 

Hunter, EvelynDr. Evelyn Hunter received her Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Auburn University after receiving her B.A. from Emory University in Atlanta. She completed her doctoral internship at the Georgia Institute of Technology Counseling Center. Dr. Hunter, who is a licensed psychologist, is currently an Assistant Professor at Presbyterian College in Clinton, SC. Her current research interests include disordered eating in ethnic minority communities, multicultural competencies in counseling psychology, and training and competency considerations in various contexts. Dr. Hunter also has a passion for teaching and enjoys encouraging students to think critically about who we are and how our cultural experiences shape our beliefs, emotions, thoughts, and behaviors. She maintains a small private practice in Greenville, SC, where she conducts individual, couples, and group therapy across a broad range of issues, including anxiety/phobias, depression, grief/loss, relationship issues, eating disorders and general eating concerns, and trauma recovery. In her free time, she enjoys her family (husband, two young boys, and two big dogs), hanging out in nature, volunteering with the Red Cross, and checking out the latest movies.

Elizabeth Louis

Louis, ElizabethElizabeth Louis is a second-year doctoral student in the counseling psychology program at the University of Georgia. As a Haitian American, her cultural roots influence her clinical and research interests, which are in disaster mental health, ethnic minority mental health, and trauma. Elizabeth’s dedication to social justice and multiculturalism is reflected through her research, clinical practice, and service related experiences.  She has received disaster mental health training with the American Red Cross and gained international experience through facilitating a mental health training program in Haiti. Locally, she is involved in teaching English to refugees and hopes to create a mental health workshop for this population. Elizabeth is also committed to serving her fellow colleagues through student organizations such as being a campus representative. She promotes an inclusive environment and engages in diverse initiatives on campus through her work with the Office of Institutional Diversity. Elizabeth hopes to become a psychologist in a non-governmental organization that serves the international community through mental health initiatives and develop culturally appropriate strategies to help diverse populations overcome disasters and trauma. Elizabeth is grateful to have her faith, the support of her family, friends, and mentors who are instrumental to her professional growth.

Tangela Roberts

Roberts, TangelaTangela Roberts is a third-year doctoral student in counseling psychology at the University of Massachusetts Boston. She received her B.A. from St. John’s University, where she was a McNair Scholar and completed her M.S. in community counseling at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Primarily, she is interested in social justice, feminist theory and methods, race and ethnicity, LGBTQ communities of color, community engagement, and psychological well-being. Tangela’s research tends to focus on the experience of individuals whose identities lie at the intersection of race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation while aiming at developing a better understanding of critical theories and focusing on intersectional identities, resilience and community support.  Prior research projects include the impact of monosexism on the sexual orientation identity development of bisexual identified persons; the role of community support on mental health for bisexual people of color; African-American and Latino gay family networks and HIV prevention; and, the implementation of a sexual ethics curriculum for adolescents at a predominantly Black and Latino high school. After completing the Ph.D., she plans to pursue an academic career and influence the field by placing issues pertinent to queer people of color at the forefront of her teaching, scholarship, and activism.

Riddhi Sandil, PhD

Sandil, RiddhiDr. Riddhi Sandil received her Ph.D. in counseling psychology from the University of Iowa. She is currently serving as Assistant Professor of Practice and Program Coordinator of the Ed.M. program in psychological counseling at Teachers College, Columbia University. As a researcher, whose professional and personal identity is strongly influenced by training, supervision and social advocacy, Dr. Sandil is interested in understanding how masters programs in counseling psychology can address issues related to CACREP lobbying and restriction of LMHC licensure eligibility. Her scholarly interests lie in evaluating bio-psycho-social factors, minority stress, and their impact on well-being and self-determination. Furthermore, Dr. Sandil is a licensed psychologist, and her clinical interests include complex trauma, working with marginalized/minority populations, LGBTQ counseling, feminist therapy, women’s concerns, identity development, individuation, and family of origin concerns. Dr. Sandil approaches her personal and professional life from a relational, feminist, and multicultural framework and enjoys developing mutually empowering and empathic relationships with others.

Emily Unzueta

Unzueta, EmilyEmily Unzueta, M.A., is a third-year doctoral student in the counseling, clinical, and school psychology program at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She received her B.A. in education from Brown University and her M.A. in mental health counseling from Boston College. Working under the mentorship of Dr. Melissa Morgan Consoli, Emily’s research focuses on resilience in Latina/o populations and multicultural and international competence and training. She is committed to furthering social justice principles and goals by utilizing qualitative methods and community based research paradigms. Clinically, Emily is interested in outreach, advocacy, and providing culturally responsive services to traditionally underserved populations in both university and community settings. She is currently completing a counseling practicum at a non-profit mental health center in downtown Santa Barbara and serves as coordinator for the Santa Barbara Wellness Project, a community-based prevention group that provides education and skills training on wellness. For self-care, Emily enjoys running, traveling, and hanging out with her family. She is a member of the National Latina/o Psychological Association, the Interamerican Society of Psychology, and APA’s Division 45.

Weiyang Xie, PhD

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADr. Weiyang Xie received her doctoral degree in counseling psychology from the University of Minnesota in 2015. She’s currently a senior clinician working at the University Counseling Center at the University of Notre Dame. She completed her APA-accredited doctoral internship at the Counseling and Wellness Center at the University of Florida in 2015. She also completed her practicum training at different university counseling centers and community settings in Minnesota. Weiyang’s clinical interests and areas of expertise include multicultural counseling, bilingual therapy (English-Mandarin), counseling with immigrants and international students, applied positive psychology (e.g., resilience, well-being, and strengths), mind-body connection, and biofeedback therapy for anxiety and medical issues. As a counselor, she attempts to facilitate students’ growth and development by providing a safe and supportive environment, help students understand themselves, explore their potential and strengths, and develop skills and build resilience. In her spare time, she enjoys various outdoor activities such as skiing, playing tennis, and jogging. She also enjoys spending time with family and friends, traveling, and playing ukulele.

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